Vegetables to plant in September

September - Western Cape - South Africa Artichoke, Asparagus Beans, Beetroot, Butternut Cardoon, Carrots, Celery, Chilis, Cucumber Eggplant Fennel Gooseberry Lettuce Melon Onion, Oriental Greens Pac Choy, Peas, Peppers, Pumpkin Radish, Rocket Salsify, Spinach, Spring Onion, Squash, Swiss Chard Watermelon Zucchini (Marrows)

By | 2018-03-11T11:49:10+00:00 September 23rd, 2013|Farming, Food, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Olive harvesting 2013

Hard work to pick and cure olives! It's been our best harvest in the past 5 years. Easy olive curing recipe: Ingredients 3 cups olives 2 cups cold water 2 cups hot water 1/4 cup canning salt Instructions Wash, pick over olives. Nick all olives deeply lengthwise along the olive. Put olives into container. Make up a brine in the proportions of 1/4 cup canning salt to 4 cups water. 2 cups cold water and 2 cup hot water is hot enough to dissolve salt, but cold enough not to cook the olives. Make enough brine to completely cover olives, weigh down the olives into the brine using a Ziploc bag of water. Cover the container of olives, set on top of a plate--the olive juice is brown and can stain your kitchen floor if you don't have protection. Soak olives in the brine for one week, then change brine completely and faithfully once/week, stir olives with a wooden spoon when you think about it . Start tasting olives after 3 weeks, keep changing brine until they are edible (not bitter). If you get mold, yeast, etc, it is harmless if the olives are covered in the brine. Just rinse your olives, pick out any rotten olives, scald the container, make up fresh brine and rebrine your olives. After the olives have been brined, can add garlic cloves, hot peppers, bay leaves, lemon, oregano, or almost anything. When you add flavorings, should store olives in refrigerator. Olives in the salt brine can be stored in their crock in a cool, dry place (the garage would work fine) If you are interested in buying fresh olives please contact us.

By | 2018-03-11T11:49:14+00:00 May 8th, 2013|Food, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Montagu – David Kramer

DAVID KRAMER was born in Worcester, South Africa in 1951, received his schooling in the same town and was awarded a bursary to study at Leeds University in the UK, where he graduated with Honours in 1974. He began his musical career as a singer/songwriter, performing at folk clubs and campus concerts across South Africa in the late 1970’s, singing satirical songs in English and Afrikaans. He portrayed himself as a rural everyman who travelled the dusty roads of small town South Africa with an old bicycle and a cheap guitar. When he released his first album in 1980, it was banned in its entirety by the SABC as it was considered too political and vulgar for the South African ear. Despite initial setbacks, he went on to be awarded 11 gold and one platinum record for sales of his albums. Today he works as a writer and theatre director. His interest and passion has, for almost thirty years been to explore South African identity. His work in South African musical theatre has focused primarily on the communities of the Cape. The thrust of the five musicals that he wrote with Taliep Petersen and one on his own, is in the retelling of a suppressed history. In 1985 he worked under the direction of the late Barney Simon, creative director of the Market Thetre in Johannesburg. As a result of this watershed experience, he started letting other actors interpret his songs, which led to his writing a musical. Four of these musical collaborations with Taliep Petersen, DISTRICT SIX, POISON AND KAT AND THE KINGS and GHOEMA have toured internationally. District Six was invited to the Edinburgh International Festival, POISON was performed in Malaysia [...]

By | 2018-03-11T11:49:15+00:00 May 8th, 2013|Uncategorized|0 Comments

2 Kloof Street, Montagu, 6720, South Africa

Phone: +27 23 614 3147

Mobile: +27 82 561 7818