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Harvested our first Blood Orange

I harvested our first ripe blood orange the other day, oh boy was that good! I planted three trees three years ago and I'm sure they will provide plenty fruit in the years to come. Here is some more information about blood oranges: What is a blood orange? As its name suggests, this orange is red in color, sometimes in splotches on the outside but definitely on the inside. The concentration of the red inside depends on the particular type of orange and growing conditions. When you squeeze it, you really get a glimpse of the blood reference as the juice will resemble more that of a cranberry than an orange. Where does the red color come from? Blood oranges are “bloody” from a pigment called anthocyanin, which is widely found in the plant kingdom and can appear red as in cherries and red cabbage to blue as in blueberries and cornflowers or even purple as in pansies and eggplants (aubergines). Anthocyanin is reported to have many health benefits as it is a powerful antioxidant that can slow or prevent the growth of cancer cells–and even kill them. Moreover blood oranges contain high amounts of Vitamin C (up to 130% of recommended daily amount), potassium, Vitamin A, iron, calcium, and even fiber. Oranges and their juice can also help prevent the build-up of bad cholesterol as well as lower the risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, and cataracts. Where do blood oranges come from? The blood orange originated in Sicily and Spain and varieties include Tarocco, Moro (or Morro), and Sanguinello (or Sanguigno). In fact you may hear the term “Sicilian Blood Oranges” even though they are grown in other parts of the [...]

By | 2015-07-04T19:37:52+00:00 July 4th, 2015|Farming, Food|0 Comments

Vegetables to plant in October

October - Western Cape - South Africa Much the same as September except that you can now sow with much more confidence directly outside and transplant seedlings outside without the worry of frost. This is such a great month full of action in the garden! Artichoke, Asparagus Beans, Beetroot, Butternut Cardoon, Carrots, Celery, Chilis, Cucumber Eggplant Fennel Gooseberry Lettuce Melon Onion, Oriental Greens Pac Choy, Peas, Peppers, Pumpkin Radish, Rocket Salsify, Spinach, Spring Onion, Squash, Swiss Chard Watermelon Zucchini (Marrows)

By | 2018-03-11T11:49:06+00:00 October 2nd, 2013|Farming, Food, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Vegetables to plant in September

September - Western Cape - South Africa Artichoke, Asparagus Beans, Beetroot, Butternut Cardoon, Carrots, Celery, Chilis, Cucumber Eggplant Fennel Gooseberry Lettuce Melon Onion, Oriental Greens Pac Choy, Peas, Peppers, Pumpkin Radish, Rocket Salsify, Spinach, Spring Onion, Squash, Swiss Chard Watermelon Zucchini (Marrows)

By | 2018-03-11T11:49:10+00:00 September 23rd, 2013|Farming, Food, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Olive harvesting 2013

Hard work to pick and cure olives! It's been our best harvest in the past 5 years. Easy olive curing recipe: Ingredients 3 cups olives 2 cups cold water 2 cups hot water 1/4 cup canning salt Instructions Wash, pick over olives. Nick all olives deeply lengthwise along the olive. Put olives into container. Make up a brine in the proportions of 1/4 cup canning salt to 4 cups water. 2 cups cold water and 2 cup hot water is hot enough to dissolve salt, but cold enough not to cook the olives. Make enough brine to completely cover olives, weigh down the olives into the brine using a Ziploc bag of water. Cover the container of olives, set on top of a plate--the olive juice is brown and can stain your kitchen floor if you don't have protection. Soak olives in the brine for one week, then change brine completely and faithfully once/week, stir olives with a wooden spoon when you think about it . Start tasting olives after 3 weeks, keep changing brine until they are edible (not bitter). If you get mold, yeast, etc, it is harmless if the olives are covered in the brine. Just rinse your olives, pick out any rotten olives, scald the container, make up fresh brine and rebrine your olives. After the olives have been brined, can add garlic cloves, hot peppers, bay leaves, lemon, oregano, or almost anything. When you add flavorings, should store olives in refrigerator. Olives in the salt brine can be stored in their crock in a cool, dry place (the garage would work fine) If you are interested in buying fresh olives please contact us.

By | 2018-03-11T11:49:14+00:00 May 8th, 2013|Food, Uncategorized|0 Comments

2 Kloof Street, Montagu, 6720, South Africa

Phone: +27 23 614 3147

Mobile: +27 82 561 7818